Absolut at Art Basel Miami Beach

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Colorful Inspiration

In thinking back to the 30’s, the idea of strong Art Deco design and a bar cart serving martinis go hand in hand. Since then, both continue to be timeless icons, and have served as the inspiration for many new creations. 

There’s a story that when the Cosmopolitan was invented, the bartender simply wanted to make a pastel pink drink for the waitresses at their bar. Starting with a classic martini glass, he created a fruity remix — a fun colorful drink for a new age. In the same way, the light hues of pink, blue, and yellow paint on the buildings of Miami brought new life into the classic Art Deco structures. 

Built in the 30s, many of the hotels on Miami Beach were worn down 50 years later. Some developers wanted to reshape the entire beach with an updated 1970s aesthetic however, luckily, fans of art deco architecture made their case that Miami Beach needed its own style. 

Much like the Cosmopolitan, what started as an experiment, turned into a movement. In the early 80s, a man named Leonard Horowitz convinced Friedman’s Bakery to let him paint their building pink and yellow. After appearing on the cover of Progressive Architecture magazine, many other buildings followed suit. Quickly, many the hotels that had been labeled relics of faded glory were reborn in a colorful new way.

Because of this strong belief that something new could be created by transforming something classic, Miami Beach is one of the most iconic cities in the world.

Photos: Sesse Lind